HRYS is a girls' fastpitch softball league serving players ages 5 to 18 in the greater Herndon-Reston, Virginia area. Separate spring and fall competitive house seasons are run with the objective of serving all the girls of the community.

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Softball is a great way to help your daughter to engage in sports in an encouraging environment that also helps form and build lasting friendship.

HRYS provides a competitive,  yet fun and social environment.  Many of our players start at the 6U level and continue with HRYS through the Legends All-Stars Summer and Glory year-round travel program, ultimately achieving success in both high school and college. Don't see your question?  Please email info@hrysfastpitch.com

What equipment will my daughter need?
I paid my reqistration but I haven't received any info from her coach?
Does my child need to go to the skills evaluation?
What levels of play do you offer?
What are the Age Groups?
Picking Softball Equipment
Photos of Softball Players and Games
Ways to Help Your Daughter’s Team
Parent Contributions to the Team

How Do I volunteer?
What does the Season Look Like?

 

 

 

What equipment will my daughter need?

HRYS provides team bats, helmets, and balls for players to use during the season.  Players are responsible to bring their own glove and cleats. Beginning players are strongly encouraged to talk to their coach prior to buying equipment, as the wrong size glove or bat will actually make it harder to learn to catch or hit.

Players for 10U and older will go through a skills evaluation each year.  Within approx 1-2 weeks after the evaluation your coach will be contacting you with specific information.  At this time coaches for 6U and 8U players will also reach out to parents.

Does my child need to go to the skills evaluation?

HRYS holds skills evaluations prior to the spring season, in preparation for the team drafts.  There is no skills evaluation for the fall season.  For the spring season: If your child is a 6U or 8U player they are not required to attend the skills evalution.  All other age groups are required to attend, so that teams can be made as fairly as possible.  If you have requested your player would like to try and play up to a higher age level, then your child will need to attend both evaluations.  Requesting to play up is not guaranteed.

What levels of play do you offer?

Our house teams are open to all skill levels and play in the spring and the fall. The Legends All-Stars Program has tryouts in May or June and plays in local tournaments through July. Glory, our year-round travel program, has tryouts around August and offers a year long competitive season. 

What are the Age Groups?
There are 5 Age Group divisions in the HRYS League. Placement in each age group is based on the player’s age as of January 1 of the current year.  For example, if your player is 10 years old on January 1, they would play in the 10U division for the spring season, even if they turn 11 during the year.   For the birth years for each age group, see the registration page. The playing differences between age groups are:

 

6U      T-Ball
8U      Machine Pitch
10U      Player Pitch 35', "No Walk" rule in effect
12U      Player Pitch 40'
Senior*   Player Pitch 43' 

*Note senior players older than 18 but still in high school are eligible to play.

HRYS in cooperation with Loudoun County Softball Alliance (LCSA) uses the following rules for each age group.

Picking Softball Equipment

 

HRYS provides team bats, helmets, and balls for players to use during the season.  Players are responsible to bring their own glove and cleats. Beginning players are strongly encouraged to talk to their coach prior to buying equipment, as the wrong size glove or bat will actually make it harder to learn to catch or hit.
Please refer to the following when purchasing gloves and bats.

 

How to Buy a Softball Glove (Required)
How to Buy a Softball Bat (Not required, but many kids eventually want their own bat)
ASA Approved Bat List

 

Photos of Softball Players and Games

 

A good article to read: Expert Tips on Taking Better Sports Photos

 

PERMISSION
Be sure you ask coach and parents if it is okay to take photos of players during games and to post.

 

LOCATION, LOCATION
Before you step into the dugout or onto the field, ask the coach if it is okay and then check with the head umpire about being on the field.
Stay clear of the players’ bats!
Try not to block the view of others behind you.

 

FLASH
Do not use a flash during games.
Umpires and/or coaches can think it is lightening.
It can distract the players especially batters, pitchers, and catchers.
At certain tournaments is prohibited.

 

NAMES
Be sure to check with coaches about photographing names on jersies. When posting photos to the HRYS Shutterfly site only use first names if at all.
Please no tagging photos

 

Ways to Help Your Daughter’s Team
  1. Learn the players’ and parents’ names.
  2. Organize snack for after the games.
  3. Keep score.
  4. Bring extra hair ties, hand warmers, toilet paper, water, and tissues.
  5. Volunteer to drive girls who need a ride.
  6. Come early and help line the fields.
  7. Make a team banner!
  8. Cheer positively for all girls and both teams!
  9. Help carry team equipment.
Parent Contributions to the Team
  1. Recognize the Commitment the Coach Has Made: The coach has made a commitment that involves many, many hours of preparation beyond the hours spent at practices and games. Recognize this commitment and the fact that is not being done because of the pay! Try to remember this whenever something goes awry during the season.
  2. Make Early, Positive Contact with the Coach: As soon as you know who your child”s coach is going to be, contact her/him to introduce yourself and let her/him know you want to help your child have the best experience she can have this season. To the extent that you can do so, ask if there is any way you can help. By getting to know the coach early and establishing a positive relationship, it will be much easier to talk with her/him later if a problem arises.
  3. Fill the Coach’s Emotional Tank: When the coach is doing something you like, let her/him know about it. Coaching is a difficult job and most coaches only hear from parents when they want to complain about something. It also makes it easier to raise problems later when you have shown support for the good things being doing. And just about every coach does a lot of things well. Take the time to look for them.
  4. Don’t Put the Player in the Middle: It is all too common for parents to share their disapproval of a coach with their children. This puts a young athlete in a bind. Divided loyalties do not make it easy for a child to do her best. Conversely, when parents support a coach, it is that much easier for the child to put her wholehearted effort into learning to play well. If you think your child’s coach is not handling a situation well, do not tell that to the player. Rather, seek a meeting with the coach in which you can talk about issues.
  5. Don’t Give Instructions During a Game or Practice: You are not one of the coaches, so do not give your child instructions about how to play. It can be very confusing for a child to hear someone other than the coach yelling out instructions during a game. If you have an idea for a tactic, go to the coach, offer it privately and let him/her decide whether to use it or not. If he/she decides not to use it, let it be. Getting to decide those things is one of the privileges he/she has earned by making the commitment to coach.
  6. Fill Your Child’s Emotional Tank: Perhaps the most important thing you can do is to be there for your child. Competitive sports are stressful to players and the last thing they need is a critic at home. Be a cheerleader for your child. Focus on the positive things she is doing and leave the correcting of mistakes to the coach. Let her know you support her without reservation regardless of how well she plays.
  7. Fill the Emotional Tanks of the Entire Team: Cheer for all of the players on the team. Tell each of them when you see them doing something well.
  8. Encourage Other Parents to Honor the Game: Don’t show disrespect for the other team or the officials. But more than that, encourage other parents to also Honor the Game.
Note: These guidelines are adapted from Positive Coaching: Building Character and Self-Esteem Through Sports by Jim Thompson, the founder and leader of the Positive Coaching Alliance.
http://www.positivecoach.org/

 

How Do I volunteer? 

There are many other ways to volunteer to help with your daughter’s team.  Please refer to the Parent section.

What Does The Season Look Like?
Our season typically starts in early April and continues into Early June for house games. Immediately after the house season, there wil be one week of playoff Games culminating in a Championship game on Saturday. HRYS participates in the Loudoun County Softball Alliance (LCSA), so for most age groups, HRYS teams will also compete against teams in Loudoun County, including Sterling and Ashburn.


6U age group: There is one practice and one game a week. Practice day varies by Coach. Games are held on Saturdays.
8U Age Group: One practice and two games per week. Practice day varies by coach. Game days are Tuesday and Saturday.
10U Age Group: One practice and two games per week. Practice day varies by coach. Game days are Thursday and Saturday. 
12U Age Group: One practice and two games per week. Practice day varies by coach. Game days are Wednesday and Saturday.
Senior Age Group: One practice and two games per week. Practice day varies by coach. Game days are Wednesday and Saturday.